Make a donation to our UFO sightings research group

The US Navy does not disclose details of what their nuclear submarine encountered in the South China Sea

Send your UFO observationReport UFO sightings Send your abduction by aliensReport your alien abduction Send your abduction by aliensUFOlogist's tools

The US Navy does not disclose details of what their nuclear submarine encountered in the South China Sea

The American nuclear submarine USS Connecticut (SSN-22) collided with an "unknown object" while diving in the waters of the Asia-Pacific region, which led to the injury of several sailors, according to American media. After a few weeks, the American Navy still does not know what it was... or doesn't want to make it public.

The US Navy does not disclose details of what their nuclear submarine encountered in the South China Sea

The U.S. Navy is not yet sure what one of its most powerful attack submarines has collided with in the South China Sea, as repair work continues on Guam, four sources familiar with the results of preliminary investigations said. As of Tuesday afternoon, the underwater object that damaged the bow of the Connecticut submarine (SSN-22) has not been definitively determined as part of various investigations into the incident that occurred on October 2.

The official version is that Connecticut came across a seamount in the South China Sea, not previously marked on maps, but this has not been confirmed – and this contradicts early rumors that it was an object moving at high speed.

Commander Cindy Fields, the spokeswoman for the submarine forces of the US Pacific Fleet (PACFLEET), commented that the command has nothing to add to its initial statement about what happened to the submarine, explaining that two independent services (the security commission convened by COMSUBPAC and the commission of the Seventh Fleet based in Japan) are investigating the incident.

The American nuclear submarine USS Connecticut

The Connecticut collided with the object during a dive on the evening of October 2, when it was operating in international waters in the Indo-Pacific region

PACFLEET reported on October 7

As a result of the impact on the front of the submarine, the forward ballast tanks were damaged, which forced the ship to make a week-long surface crossing to Guam. Four sources interviewed confirmed the Navy's public statement that the submarine's reactor compartment was not damaged during the mysterious collision.

Since she returned to Guam, the Connecticut has been under evaluation to determine what repairs she needs for safe sailing and subsequent repairs

Fields said

The nearest dry dock for servicing large submarines is in Hawaii. Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, which is located near the home port of the warship in Bremerton, Washington, is the second closest dry dock.

Allegations of a cover-up

While repairs and various investigations are ongoing, Chinese officials accuse the US of hiding details of the incident from Beijing.

The Chinese side has repeatedly expressed serious concern about this and asked the American side to provide explanations. We have seen nothing but a short and vague statement made by the US military belatedly, and confirmation from the alleged informant that the incident occurred in the South China Sea. Such an irresponsible and cautious practice gives the countries of the region and the international community every reason to doubt the truth of the incident and the intentions of the United States

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhai Jun said on Tuesday

Connecticut is one of three Seawolf-class attack submarines. The ship sailed in May to patrol the western Pacific Ocean and made at least two port calls in Japan. Earlier, Pentagon spokesman John Kirby rejected China's accusations that the United States was involved in covering up the incident.

A strange way to hide something if you publish a press release about it

Kirby told reporters when asked about China's accusation

Could this "lack of details" about what happened after the submarine collision be related to recent sightings of trans-environment UFOs chasing ships and diving into the oceans?

USO (unidentified submerged object)?

The secrecy and the little that has been made public, as well as the fact that China does not take responsibility for the fact that the incident is related to it, have led to several quite justified assumptions. The most popular and the one that soon became popular is that Connecticut could have collided with USO (unidentified submerged object).

And the fact is that the latest revelations about the possible underwater origin of some UFOs - or at least UFOs with underwater bases - were partially and indirectly recognized by the US Navy itself.

Could an American nuclear submarine have collided with one of these objects? Recent unconfirmed comments that contradict official reports seem to point in that direction:

The alleged leak of first-hand testimony about what happened.

The alleged leak of first-hand testimony about what happened.

An alleged submariner linked to the incident reportedly commented that only a submarine "can move so fast" at these depths and that the collision occurred in just a few seconds, superficially damaging "half of the submarine." The well-known military also acknowledged the possibility that it was a "USO".


Related tags:

USO  US Navy  USS Connecticut  South China Sea  UFOs  2021  submarine


You can help us by sharing the article:

We tried to post useful and high-quality information for you. We would be grateful if you would share this article with your friends, acquaintances and colleagues. Maybe it will affect their life and make it better.


Random UFO or conspiracy article

Connecticut. UFO with passengers on board. 1957. Old Saybrook,

1957. Old Saybrook, Connecticut. UFO with passengers on boardThis UFO report, with passengers visible through the windows, is similar in many ways to other reports from Connecticut made five years earlier. It was studied by the former deputy director and current consultant of the NICAP, Richard Hall, and an employee of the same committee, Izabel Davis.

See more...